White Tree Frog

Western New York Herpetological Society 

www.wnyherp.org © 2001 - 2002 by Western New York Herpetological Society 

This document is for guidance only and should not be used as the sole source of information. New information is being developed daily. It is recommend that a concerted effort be made to maintain up-to-date knowledge of the animals of interest. 

Common Name: White's Tree Frog Dumpy, Smiling, or Australian Green Tree Frog

Latin name:  Litoria caerulea

Native to: Northeast Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia and the Torres Straits

Size: Average 4 inches males, 5.5 females

Life span: 20 years plus

General appearance: Smooth green rubbery skin (can turn brown occasionally or have whit speckles); fat and flabby appearance. At one year of age, breeding males grow nuptial pads (puffy pads where their "thumb" and "palm" meet). Tadpoles are large, 1.75 – 4 inches (45 - 100 mm), dark green or dark gray-green in color.

Housing requirements: 

Enclosure: Larger is better for this species, a minimum of 25 gallons for an adult pair is recommended. An arboreal enclosure is the best choice, as tree frogs will spend most of their time being high in the enclosure. Plants and hollow logs/branches provide shelter and security. Can be safely housed with other White’s tree frogs or with other similar sized tree frogs.

Temperature:

Temperatures should be up to 86°F (30°C), but can be reduced to 68°F- 75F(20°C) at night.

Heat/Light: White’s tree frogs are nocturnal. There is no specific lighting requirements. Live plants will require a full spectrum light. An under tank heater can be used but do not use heat rocks.

Substrate: Potting soil, peat moss or a few sheets of damp paper towels on the bottom. Avoid using small bark and gravel due to danger of ingestion. 

Environment: Semi-tropical – A moderate amount of humidity is required. This can be achieved through misting of the frogs and enclosure two or more times a day. Additionally a large water dish with a depth of about four inches is required.

Diet: Insectivores - crickets, cockroaches, locusts, moths and beetles. Dust crickets with calcium & vitamins 3 times a week. Feed frogs daily. They are known for overeating and obesity. Fat is stored in the supra tympanic ridges. An oblast frog’s supra tympanic ridges will cover the tynpanic membrane ("ear") Feed only what is consumed in a few minutes.

Maintenance: Clean the enclosure weekly. Remove dead insects and clean water bowl as several times a week or as needed, but no less than weekly. You may wash with a mild bleach solution (5%) or liquid soap and thoroughly rinse. Regular handling should be avoided. Hands must be washed and rinsed prior to touching the frog and should remain wet.


Western New York Herpetological Society 

www.wnyherp.org © 2001 - 2002 by Western New York Herpetological Society 

This document is for guidance only and should not be used as the sole source of information. New information is being developed daily. It is recommend that a concerted effort be made to maintain up-to-date knowledge of the animals of interest.